3 Hacks to Developing a Cleaning Routine You’ll Actually Stick To

3 Hacks to Developing a Cleaning Routine You’ll Actually Stick To

What’s one of the biggest lies culture tells homemakers? Developing a cleaning routine is simple and easy to stick to. Am I right? But what if you hate cleaning? I got you. Here are 3 simple hacks to designing a system that works for you and your family.

From my extensive research, (read: asking all the women I know which they like better, cooking or cleaning?) people either get the cleaning gene or the cooking gene, but it’s never both. Never, not once have I met someone who enjoys both.

Do you? Most likely not. (If you are the magical unicorn who enjoys both, please tell me you secret magical ways.) One is always so much harder than the other. If you’re like me, then that’s cleaning. So, here are my best and most practical tips for developing a cleaning routine that works.

#1. Clarify Your Expectations

First, you need to set appropriate expectations. What does a clean home mean to you? Is it consistently mopped floors, floors cleared of clutter/toys, or floors being clear chunks of yesterday’s breakfast? You do you. This is your home, no one else’s.

Tidiness is different from person to person and from parenting season to parenting season. I expect more of myself (and children) now that everyone is out of the baby and toddler stages. However, my expectations are not equal to a family that has teenagers. My kids are very much in the toy years. It’s unrealistic of me to expect all toys to be put away at the end of every day, because toys are life right now. I mean, there’s currently a pretend golf course in the playroom.

So, I don’t expect the toys to be perfectly picked up every single day. If I did, then I would be correcting and scolding my children constantly. No one wants that! Instead, we do a big clean-up once a week. This works for us. The toy years are a season of childhood, and that is where we are at right now.

#2. Decide How Much Time Do You Want to Devote to Cleaning?

The second thing to consider when developing a cleaning routine is how much time you can reasonably and sanely d