The Best Gifts for Your ADHD Child

The Best Gifts for Your ADHD Child

Below is a list of what I believe will be wonderful gifts for an ADHD child. As a mom of two ADHD children, I know shopping for holiday presents can be overwhelming. I hope you find this gift guide helpful in narrowing down your search. This post contains affiliate links, which helps support my time and effort. Happy shopping!

This fidget set is great if your child likes variety, or you’re more sure what kind of fidget would be helpful for them. We have these set up as a fidget station in our homeschool room.

This vibrating cushion is wonderful for proprioception and sensory input. My kids really enjoyed it when they were feeling unregulated. I like this one because it is a little bit bigger than some of the others, and it is easy to clean.

Hoverboards are just plain fun. They are also helpful in developing coordination and balance. This particular hoverboard connects to bluetooth, so your child can enjoy music or audiobooks while they cruise around. It also comes in a variety of colors.

My kids LOVE soft blankets. This might be the coziest weighted blanket I could find, and I am definitely adding it to my cart. The stitching ensures equal weight distribution, which I appreciate. As a general rule, you want your weighted blanket to be about 10% of the users total weight.

My kids love figuring out how things work. I feel like a set of gears is a great way to do just that. I like this set because there are plenty of pieces for multiple children to play with at the same time, and it comes with its own storage container.

My kids found this ball in a Sunday school room at our church, and they are obsessed! This ball has some weight to it, but it is also soft and squishy. I plan to order 3, so each of my children has their own. 

An oldie but a goodie. Jump ropes are going into stockings at our house this year. 

Hues and Cues is a favorite board game in our house. It is designed to be played by the whole family, regardless of age. My favorite aspect is the game encourages the players to root for each other’s success. 

This book is actually part of our homeschool materials, but it is WONDERFUL. It has helped my four year old learn to take deep breaths when upset, which you know is an extremely helpful skill.

Legos. All the Legos. This is a great little starter set and includes an instruction booklet to make a variety of things. Plus you can use the container as storage.

This is a beginning chapter book series that my girls love. The illustrations are bright and colorful, which really helps keep their attention.

For your aspiring artist. This light up tracing pad is perfect for kids who are learning how to draw or who need some extra fine motor skills practice.

I loved this thing as a kid. This is a great gift for an ADHD child, because it gives some vestibular stimulation.

Tools AND dinosaurs? What more could a kid need? This is definitely on my four year old’s list.

Here are some other great websites to check out:

Kid Made Modern

Green Craft Kids

Montessorri Services

Epic!

You can also check out my gift guide from last year here.

There you have it! Great gifts for your ADHD child this holiday season. What toys and activities have your ADHD children loved? Tell us about them in the comments below. Happy Holidays!

Tea Time: A Time to Connect

Tea Time: A Time to Connect

Tea time is a pastime practiced all over the world. However, it is not very prevalent in the US. Even though I have always enjoyed an afternoon cup of tea (23andMe says I am 98% British, so I guess it’s in my blood), I never really thought about having an organized tea time. That is until I started homeschooling. Sitting around the table together, enjoying a treat and a cup of tea is definitely a thing in the homeschool community. And let me tell you, my heart soared when I learned tea time could be a part of our weekly routine.

What is Tea Time?

I know this is a basic question, but it is one I honestly had. When you are a new homeschooler, you have to learn the lingo. Terms like spines, morning basket, living books, etc are specific to the homeschool community. I spent more time than I like to admit googling this stuff, ha. So, what exactly is tea time? Honestly, it is what ever you want it to be. You don’t even have to drink tea! Seriously, my oldest drinks water during ours. I define tea time as coming together around the table to enjoy a yummy snack and each other’s company. That’s all. It doesn’t have to be complicated or fancy if you don’t want it to be.

Our Routine

One thing I learned about myself at the beginning of my intentional living journey is my ideal and my reality often do not match. That is okay! Learning, knowing, and accepting what my capacity is a gift from the Lord. Truly. I say this because, in a perfect world I want to have a beautiful tea time with made from scratch treats every school day. This is not reality. I plan for three days a week, but most of the time it is twice a week. Furthermore, store bought snacks often grace our table. Did you know I almost gave up on the idea of tea time because I knew I wouldn’t be able to have homemade baked good every time? Talk about legalistic thinking! (I am working on it) Store bought cookies are the unsung heroes for us.

Alright, here are the details you’re looking for. A few times a week, while my youngest is napping, I make a pot of tea for me and my middle child. I fill a little pitcher of water for my oldest, who, like I said, doesn’t like tea. I set out some tea cups, saucers, and a plate of cookies. I typically serve enough for each of us to have two treats. I call the girls over, pour the tea, and we all sit down together. Then I either read a story, devotion, poem, or we answer the fun table conversation cards. This is also a time to practice manners. My children love it. I am planning on including my youngest once he get a little bit older and no longer napping. On average, this special time lasts for about 15-20 minutes.

Make It Your Own

The beauty of tea time is that it can be whatever you’d like it to be. And you, of course, do not have to be a homeschooler. You can enjoy tea time before bed, on a Sunday afternoon, and any time in between. As long as you are making time to connect with your family, then you are doing it right.

Tell me your thoughts! Would you like to start a tea time with your children? What treats would you serve? What do you want it to look like? Tell me all about it in the comments below. And, as always, if this post encouraged your, share it with your friends.

Road Trip with Kids: Surviving to Thriving

Road Trip with Kids: Surviving to Thriving

Intentionally Well: Striving for present intentionality every day.

Going on a road trip with kids isn’t something that conjures feelings of rainbows and sunshine. I get it. Having your whole family crammed in the car for an extended amount of time feels overwhelming. As you probably know (or maybe not), we live in Indianapolis. Our entire family lives in Alabama. So, over the last three years, we have become accustomed to long road trips with our kids. I am here to share with you all the things we do to make these trips not only bearable but also fun.

Prep Expectations in Advance

If you are familiar with Intentionally Well, it shouldn’t surprise you to see preparation at the top of the list. Ha! I like to plan. Here is what I do. First, I talk often about the trip with my kids. I mark the dates of the vacation on my children’s monthly calendar which is always posted on our refrigerator. They really love counting down the days until we leave. I remind them the travel days will be spent in the car. I tell them over and over again that we will be driving all day. This helps manage their expectations. It takes about eight hours to our house to my parents house according to Maps without stopping. However, we know that stopping often is a given when traveling with kids. Last time, it took us about eleven hours to make that drive. Eleven.

Snacks

We usually keep pretty basic snacks in our house. Fruit, Larabars, raisins, etc.. But when we go on a road trip with kids, we go all out with the snacks. Gummies…you got it. Chips…you got it. Literally, whatever the kids want, I will pack it. I promise having favorite snacks on a long car ride is worth it. I mean, I love the strawberry sour straws like there is no tomorrow on a road trip. Treat yourself and your kids, mama.

Activities

I did a pole in Instagram, and it was about 60/40 as to families preferring activity books to screens for road trips. We utilize both. My three year old also plays with his favorite toys really well in the car, so those always get packed. As far as what my children do to occupy themselves in the car, I let them choose. I don’t limit the screens or a toy or a book. They can to do whatever they like as long as they are being respectful of others (use headphones, share, etc). I am also a fan of listening to audiobooks during long car trips. I’ve included some links to a few of our favorite car activities below.

Potty Breaks

It’s inevitable that you will have to stop multiple times during your trip. We usually end up stopping for one reason or another about every one and a half to two hours. If your kids are younger, you might be stopping every hour. It is what it is. However, I have found some tricks to get the most out of each stop. First, stop at the big truck stops if you can (Love’s, Pilot…). I find that the bathrooms at these establishments are bigger and cleaner than most of the regular gas stations. They offer more snack choices, and they are usually situated at exits with several food options. Next on the list is rest stops. These are great if you don’t need food. Rest stops almost always have some sort of green space. Kids are able to run around and really get those wiggles out. Lastly, we enjoy stopping at the restaurant Cracker Barrel. Cracker Barrel has the little store you can explore and you can also order a drink to go from the register. The facilities are clean, and it’s just something a little different and unexpected for the kids.

I hope these tips and tricks help you thrive on your next road trip with your kids. Have any other tips to share with others? Post them in the comments below. As always, please share this post with your friends if you enjoyed it!

Entertain kids wherever you go with On-The-Go Craft Kits from Kid Made Modern.

Living in Zones

Living in Zones

I created zones for my kids and myself in our home. I felt like there was zero order to my home. Do you ever feel like that? Like there are people and things all over your house all the time? This is so common, especially when you have kids. It is especially so when you are homeschooling, because you are using your house each and every day. Toys migrate from the play room to the living room to the bedroom to even the bath tub. By the end of summer, I’d had enough of this mess, literally and figuratively.

What Do I Mean?

What do I mean by zones? I forget where I first heard of turning your space into zones, but I was reminded of the idea by Erin from Cotton Stem. The idea of creating zones means using your space intentionally to provide a change of scenery, spark creativity, or just a place to go that has a purpose. For example, that random corner in your kitchen that’s kind of dead space – let’s turn it into something useful!

Book Nook Zone

made a little book corner in her kids’ bedroom. I thought, “Wow, I can do that!”. And I did. I went around my house and grabbed my son’s Anywhere Chair, a cozy blanket my kids love, an extra end table we randomly had, the basket of books which was not getting read in our playroom, and voila! We had our own reading corner in the upstairs loft. We named it the Book Nook, and it is now where my big kids do their independent reading each day. They LOVE it, and they are actually reading the forgotten books that were formerly in the playroom.

Bonus School Space Zone

With the success of the Book Nook, I looked for other ways to implement more zones. We have a large loft area upstairs, and it wasn’t being utilized well. The book nook was in one corner of the room, but I saw the opportunity to make the loft even more purposeful. I moved a desk that was in my daughter’s room (it was only storing doll clothes) to the loft. I added a lamp and a globe to the desk. BOOM! Now we have a zone for school work other than our homeschool room. We use this when someone needs to move to a quiet space. Because the kids take online piano lessons, I moved our keyboard to the same wall as the desk to be included in the school zone.

TV and Video Game Zone

I positioned the TV and Nugget couch to the next area in the loft to create a “lounging zone”. The TV cabinet also stores our LEGOs, so these are out of the kid’s bedrooms. This little TV zone get a lot of use on the weekends when my kids watch more shows and enjoy playing the Wii. It’s a small area. It’s literally just the Nugget and the TV, but the special thing about creating zones is you don’t have to have a lot of space to make something special.

Gross Motor Zone

Finally, the last zone I created in our loft is the “gross motor” zone. This is the biggest zone. I have a toddler trampoline in a corner and a sensory swing to hang from the ceiling. The Nugget Couch can easily be pulled over to make an obstacle course, slide, or whatever the kids want to create. Lastly, I added the little toddler slide from the backyard. I wanted an area where kids could play rough and get their wiggles out. We live in the Midwest, and it will soon be too cold to play outside. Having this play space is essential, and it’s already being used.

Now It’s Your Turn

I know not everyone has a large unused loft in their home. However, the idea behind creating zones is using the little corners and nooks you do have. Turn them into a special place for your kids to go. Maybe it’s setting aside the end of your kitchen table and leaving out crafting supplies, or trays and tubs of playdough that the kids can access on their own. Maybe it’s taking that kids table that isn’t really getting used anymore and turning it into a board game table. Maybe you need a “mom zone” to keep your calendar, file mail, and meal plan. I created my “mom zone” in our kitchen. It is so nice to have all my things in one place. Assess what’s not working or take a space that isn’t being used efficiently, then let your imagination flourish. Take a look around and share what you come up with!

Below are a few links to some things that we have in our zones, but don’t feel like you have to buy a bunch of stuff. Shop your house first, then see where you need to fill in the blanks.

Indoor Sensory Swing:

Toddler Trampoline:

Cozy chair for your own Book Nook:

Toddler Slide:

Our Homeschool Bible Curriculum

Our Homeschool Bible Curriculum

I use the word homeschool Bible curriculum loosely here. The word routine might be more appropriate. However you phrase it, I want to share what we are doing for our Bible lessons in our homeschool this year. Our faith is part of our daily life. We are a Christian family, and my husband is actually in vocational ministry. We talk about God and the Good News in our daily life often. With that said, I have chosen to do some intentional instruction on the Bible this year. My school aged kids are still young, being only in second grade and kindergarten, so I really wanted to take that into consideration when deciding what our goals would be. I decided that rather than focus on scripture memorization, I wanted my kids to learn the narrative of the Bible. I wanted them to learn and have a better understanding of the people and stories of the Bible, and how they reveal God’s love for us.

Our Bible Time

I am using a children’s Bible as our main source to accomplish this. Guys, I love this children’s bible so much. Each story is so beautifully and clearly written on a child’s level without sounding babyish. The corresponding chapter and verses are always given if you want to go even deep with your learner. At the end of each story, there is a section called Christ Connection, and this is where the story (whether taken from the Old or New Testament) is brought back to Jesus and the gospel. Lastly, the passage ends with a comprehension question for the learner. This bible isn’t particularly meant for schooling, but it so beautifully serves that purpose for our family. We also read from faith based picture books, which always spark meaningful conversations.

This set up has worked really nicely with my girls for our homeschool bible curriculum. The “lessons” are short and engaging but also very meaningful. We are focusing on the New Testament for this fall semester. We are going to learn all about the life and work of Jesus, which will culminate with celebrating His birthday at Christmas.

Also, can I just say how much I miss in person church?! Man….anyone else? Okay, thanks. I just needed to put that somewhere.

**Links are affiliates which helps to support my little passion blog here at Intentionally Well. Thank you for your support**

Sending My Child to Preschool

Sending My Child to Preschool

I will be sending my child to preschool. But wait a minute….Didn’t I just write a whole post about our decision to homeschool? Yes. Yes, I did. We are homeschooling are kindergartener and second grader. However, we decided that our almost three year old will still attend his preschool this year. He will be going to school two mornings a week starting mid-August.

What Led to This Decision?

There was a lot that went into this decision, and it wasn’t easy given the current state of the world. Some of the reasons I’m sending my child to preschool are acknowledging that what’s best for one child in our family might not be the best choice for another child. And that is okay. Our preschooler needs consistent opportunities to be around a group of peers. He needs to learn that he can have fun with other people rather than just mommy and daddy and sisters. He needs some more practice in following rules in a more structured environment like a classroom. Are you catching a theme? We really feel that the social skills he will gain in preschool this year will be a huge benefit for him. Teaching those types of social skills at home can be really difficult (although, definitely not impossible). He also has a minor speech delay. We are confident that preschool will continue to propel his speech forward. And lastly, he LOVES his preschool. He loves circle time and singing songs and dancing and all the things. He thrived last year in his little class, and I have no doubt he will do the same this year.

Dealing with Doubt

Now, what about the Big C? The Corona? This is where I am just going to have to trust and rely on God. I have His peace right now. If something changes, then we can always reevaluate. The school is putting procedures in place to keep staff and the kids safe, without being too over the top. Kids will still be able to be kids. Our family has already had Covid19. And even though the whole immunity situation is still a big question mark, we are confident that if/when we are exposed again, that our bodies will know how to fight the virus.

We’re All Just Doing Our Best

There are no easy or clear answers for anything these days. We are all doing the best we can with the information we have. And that is okay. Our kids are going to be okay. Mama, your kids are going to be okay! What is best for us this year might not be what we choose for the following year. Just like everyone else, we will take things day by day, week by week, and month by month. Tell me more about how your kids will do school this year. Are all of your kids on the same path? Or are different kids doing different things? Do you have peace about your decisions?

Our Decision to Homeschool

Our Decision to Homeschool

We have made the decision to homeschool our children. Like every other family in America, school is going to look different for us this year. However, our switch to homeschooling was not a reaction to the Coronavirus. Homeschooling has been on and off our hearts since forever. When we lived in the south, I had many friends who homeschooled (how many times do you think I will type this world out in this post? haha!). I was so intrigued by it. But my oldest is an extrovert, and I felt like our personalities clashed often when I would try to teach her things or switch to “school mode” at home. So, I doubted myself. I doubted my ability, even though I taught preschool before kids.

But Then Things Changed

Fast forward a couple of years, and our kids were thriving in their preschools. They were learning, having fun, and I was enjoying those few hours of separation (having littles is tough, guys). Every time homeschooling started to creep back into my mind, I would push it out with all these positives. Then came Kindergarten for my oldest. I was dreading it. It was SUCH a long day, and I knew a lot of that time was filler. She wouldn’t get home until about 4:00 and would be utterly exhausted. And that’s exactly what happened. I really felt like the long school day was stealing our family time. Because my husband works in ministry, our weekends are often busy. Homeschooling, again, started to weigh on me, but I put a pin in it.

Then came first grade. We loved her teacher, but the school wasn’t meeting some specific needs my child had. When I would bring this up (over and over again), I was met with a lot of explanations but also a lot of resistance. My middle was in pre-k, and the thought of her having to deal with the long day of public school kindergarten made my brain hurt. And so in January of 2020, we once and for all decided that public school was not working for our family. We knew then that we would be homeschooling the following year. We told the kids our decision (they were so excited!), and I started dabbling in researching homeschool methods and curriculums (curricula?).

The World Came Crashing Down

And then the world as we knew it came crashing down. When schools closed in March of 2020, my oldest was sent assignments to do at home, and she would upload her work for her teacher to see. It was here that I got a really good sense of how she was being taught, and I was like no wonder! Neither of us had much fun with this e-learning. It was a chore. I had already ordered some homeschool materials, so we withdrew our oldest 2 kids from their perspective schools and started our homeschool journey right then and there.

It was so great! Even with having to take breaks as I recovered from Covid, the kids really learned a lot. Best of all, we saw them grow closer as siblings and have FUN with school. We did school until the end of May and took a break in June to enjoy the summer. It was really nice to have those weeks to slowly ease into what homeschool would look like for our family.

Looking Ahead

The week after the Forth of July, we officially started our new homeschool year. I have a second grader, a Kindergartener, and a toddler (who will still attend preschool two mornings a week). We are about three weeks in, and so far so good….I think. Just kidding! It’s good. We are learning new rhythms and routines. Learning to give and receive grace. Learning when to push through and when to take it slow. Learning how to balance all the things and not feel stressed or overwhelmed. I’ve loved all of it. I love seeing my kids learn new things and know that I was a part of that.

School is going to be different for everyone this year. Some families are making the decision to homeschool, some are choosing virtual school, some are choosing in person school (as much as the districts will allow). There are no easy or clear answers for any of us. I am here for you. I support you. I’m actually going to be sending my youngest to preschool! What works for our family might not work for your family, and that’s ok! Share with me what you and your family will be doing this fall in the comments.

Preparing for Covid19 and Talking to Your Kids About It

Preparing for Covid19 and Talking to Your Kids About It

After sharing my story, I have had several moms ask me about preparing for covid19. Experts all agree that most Americans will get this virus at some point. But, that’s ok! Most of us will be able to self manage symptoms at home. I do not want to down play that this disease is serious for some, but this post is meant to help families who will experience the virus in its mild/moderate form.

Prepare Your Children

Talk to you kids in a simple and matter of fact way about what is going on in the world. My kids are seven, five, and two. The two year old obviously doesn’t have a clue, but my other kids had some questions. When schools first started closing, we very plainly told them that there was a new virus going around that can be very serious for people who are older and who are already sick (that is how we defined preexisting conditions for them in this context), and some people will have to go to the hospital. We told them that the virus was not really dangerous for our family – that even if we got sick, we would be ok. But, we explained how everything was closing to help keep people safe and healthy.

My husband and I chose not to talk about news headlines in front of the kids or our fears and anxieties. When the virus was confirmed to be making its way through our own family, we were able to simply say, “Yes, mommy has coronavirus, and two of you have already had it. Remember your cough? That was the virus, but now you are all better.” In fact, just this morning, my 5yo complained of a stomachache and has a low grade temperature. I told her that it was her turn to have the virus, and she just said ok and went back to playing. All along, we have validated their feelings about things being different and hard with social distancing and quarantine. But we have always always reiterated that this is what we need to do to help keep people safe and healthy.

Practical Steps in Preparing for Covid19

As far as what actions to take, here are a few ideas of things to do (and hoarding things is NOT one of them). If your time and budget allows, making freezer meals will help. The fatigue and aches are real. They also come and go day by day. Having quick and easy meals that are already prepared will help conserve your energy. Honey was also something that was nice to have on hand. It is helpful for soothing a cough and a sore throat. For the body aches, we have been using Tylenol. There is mixed information about the use of ibuprofen, so speak to your own doctor about that. Taking a warm bath with 2 cups of epsom salts also helped with the body aches that would come on in the evening.

Most importantly, REST if you start to feel ill. This is so hard for moms, especially if your children are little. But please, this is NOT the time to try to push through. Covid19 is such a strange disease. The symptoms come and go for a while. Some people, like me, will take a turn for the worse around days 7-9. I really thought I was over it, then I started to really have breathing difficulty. Do not push yourself. Do not put your body under any additional stress. Turn the TV on for the kids, order them a few new toys, do what ever you need to do to be able to rest just do it.

Lastly, don’t panic. This is a hard one. I know it is. How can we not panic when we are getting daily death toll updates and news conferences? It’s all so incredibly heartbreaking. But, when you or someone in your family starts having symptoms, just take it day by day. Call your doctor for advice and care instructions. Do your best to not focus on all the what ifs. If that means you need to turn off the news and really guard what you see and hear, then do it. Protecting your mental health is just as important as protecting your physical health when preparing for covid19.